Satellite Size of School Bus to hit Earth

by Susan Waldrop, Staff Writer 31 views0

 

A six-ton satellite the size of a school bus is going to hit Earth around this Friday Sept. 23rd, “Give or take a day” as NASA says. which could leave debris about 500 miles long. NASA says the risk to humans is “extremely small.”

 

The satellite’s re-entry could break up into about 100 pieces as it falls even viewable in the daytime. It has been 30 years since the last space equipment, Skylab, fell to Earth.  NASA does not know where it may all land, but will know more as each day closer to ‘Impact day’ approaches.

NASA said updates in the final 24 hours  before it hits will be given to the public.

Not knowing for sure where it will enter the atmosphere NASA said “It depends on solar flux and the spacecraft’s orientation as its orbit decays. As re-entry draws closer, predictions on the date will become more reliable.”

Officials at NASA, tell the public not to touch of a piece space debris if they should come across it. NASA also reminds people, any part of the wounded satellite is considered government property. Officials encourage anyone to contact local law enforcement for assistance.

One could only imagine what it might be like if the space station which is as large as a football field weighing 861,804 pounds ever fell into our atmosphere to earth. The old saying “What goes up must come down” seems to fit in this instance and maybe NASA should look into what could be done if the space station ever fell to earth.

One site that provides facts and figures is http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/onthestation/facts_and_figures.html

Station Sightings

You can find out when the ISS is over your city or find out where it is right now at this link. sightings page.

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