Uncertainty Surrounds Prop 8

by Cougar News Staff 278 views0

Back in the 2008 election the state of California had a tough duty to accomplish: define marriage. Like the rest of the state, residents in the Santa Clarita Valley skirmished over the constitutionality of same sex marriage with rally’s for and against Prop 8 on the town’s busiest street corners for months.

A vote in favor of Proposition 8 declares that only a marriage between a man and a woman is recognized or valid in the state of California. A vote against Proposition 8 defines marriage as a union between any two people regardless of gender, which would include same-sex couples.

Just over half of registered voters approved Proposition 8. But in August 2010, a federal judge in San Francisco decided that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry, striking down Proposition 8. As one can imagine, this ruling stirred up tempers and emotions on both ends of the Prop.

“Who’s to say that a man won’t look at the fact that a man can marry a woman, a man can marry a man, and a woman can marry a woman, and think if it’s my civil right to marry whoever I want, then why can’t I marry two women or two men?” said Olivia Allsman, a student and voter who opposes the idea of same-sex marriage.

“I really do believe in equality and our constitutional rights. I feel as if we were banned and pushed away from everyone else just because they won’t allow us to get married.” said Aaron Savelli, a student and proponent for the recent ruling on the Proposition.

Supporters of Proposition 8 vowed to appeal and take the case straight to the Supreme Court and that is exactly what they are doing. As of right now, a recent appeal has enforced a stay on same-sex marriage; meaning wedding bells may not be ringing until early 2011.