Inside a soccer players life

by Nicolette Erzrumly 563 views0

If you play soccer in this valley, you know Syian Wignal. And chances are, Syian knows you too. wignal family

Syian was Born in Kingston Jamaica in the 1970’s. He started to play soccer around the age of nine years old. “I started to play soccer as an avenue to get away from the crime and violence in and around my community in Jamaica,” Wignal says. “Once you play sports, people look up to you, and respect you as someone others can follow.” Living in Jamaica in these times were hard, and that’s why Siyan turned to soccer. He lived in a very unsafe community in Jamaica.

“I’ve seen several of my friends get involved in the wrong crowd of people…Playing some form of sports in Jamaica is a safe passage to get out of the community and the country if all possible.” Becoming involved in a sport changed Syian’s life.

Years passed, and on August 17th 2004, Syian moved to California to enroll at The Master’s College. He played soccer there for four years and received his BA in Biblical Counseling.  After his years at Masters College Syian moved to Santa Clarita and never left.

“I like this valley very much because it’s a fun place to live and my immediate lives here, my wife and two kids.”

Syian has such a strong passion for soccer that he still continues to play the sport today. He came across a facebook post about an Adult league soccer team that had formed in Santa Clarita; an adult, co-ed recreational  soccer league in Santa Clarita Valley.

“I decided to play in this league because of what it stands for, no aggressive plays, no fighting, no cussing at the officials, and for once, I’m having fun while I compete. In college it was all business 24/7”.

Syian concludes that moving to Santa Clarita has changed his life. “I became a stronger man of God, I met my wife, I met a lot of new people. I work here, my son’s friends are here. I have no negative feedback at all.”

So if you ever see him around the soccer field, whether he’s on or off the field, hardly a person can’t walk by without Syian greeting them.